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Two-Third of Canadians Want to Work After Retirement
#1
I find this funny...http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/201...ey-110104/

I posted this and a few comments around it on my blog but find it amazing how so many Canadians will be working after "Retirement" because they have to. They have no money or any retirement plans at all. People need to start taking control of this NOW instead of waiting for the government to help them. Our CPP (Canadian Pension Plan) won't exist for us in our 20's and 30's because the baby boomer's are going to tap it out.

Thoughts?
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#2
I've always told my (adult) kids to never expect the government to take care of them - they need to be proactive about their future.

I guess the question is: do people WANT to work after retirement (my husband and I enjoy working!) or do they NEED to work?

Big difference.
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#3
to me the word "retirement" ranks right up there with "terminal cancer" and "I'm sorry, there's nothing we can do"

Retirement must only appeal if you're spending your life doing things you don't want to do.
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#4
"69 per cent said they planned to keep working. Fifty-seven per cent of these respondents said they wanted to work to remain socially active by doing so, while 72 per cent said they wanted to remain mentally active."

It think that is a good thing. Most of them want to work to continue to be around people and to remain mentally active. What value would they have to their lives if all they did was to play bingo, shuffleboard and golf?

How many Diamonds continue to work after turning 65? Yager has continued to work at some level after turning 65. Britt is probably 65. He's still working.

How many Diamonds have actually stopped working at 65 and told their group that they decided to retire from their Amway career?

Most have probably continued because the same reasons as the people in the story above.

***************

btw, I would be more worried about the societal effect of those people who DON'T want to work after they retire.
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#5
sit in the back yard and die :eek:
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#6
What's retirement?????????????????????????? :grin: :grin: :grin:
'The only way I can succeed in business is to proactively do something for 'MY BUSINESS' every day'
I look to the Future - for the Future is where I'm going to spend the rest of my Life
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#7
MichMan Wrote:"69 per cent said they planned to keep working. Fifty-seven per cent of these respondents said they wanted to work to remain socially active by doing so, while 72 per cent said they wanted to remain mentally active."

It think that is a good thing. Most of them want to work to continue to be around people and to remain mentally active. What value would they have to their lives if all they did was to play bingo, shuffleboard and golf?


The funny thing is who said that a Job has to keep you mentally active and socially active? There are A LOT of different ways other than bing, shuffleboard and golf. Sure I love golf but I also love the outdoors and there are tons of different organizations that people can participate in such as the Alpine Club of Canada. You can meet people there and be mentally active. That's just one example but there are hundreds if not thousands of different things you can join.

How about being selfless and giving back by volunteering after you "retire". There are many different capacities for that.

I think the biggest lie is that the Job is the be all and that mentality needs to stop or change.
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#8
I don't have a job and I'm mentally and socially active. :grin:
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#9
expeditionoftruths Wrote:
MichMan Wrote:"69 per cent said they planned to keep working. Fifty-seven per cent of these respondents said they wanted to work to remain socially active by doing so, while 72 per cent said they wanted to remain mentally active."

It think that is a good thing. Most of them want to work to continue to be around people and to remain mentally active. What value would they have to their lives if all they did was to play bingo, shuffleboard and golf?


The funny thing is who said that a Job has to keep you mentally active and socially active? There are A LOT of different ways other than bing, shuffleboard and golf. Sure I love golf but I also love the outdoors and there are tons of different organizations that people can participate in such as the Alpine Club of Canada. You can meet people there and be mentally active. That's just one example but there are hundreds if not thousands of different things you can join.

How about being selfless and giving back by volunteering after you "retire". There are many different capacities for that.

I think the biggest lie is that the Job is the be all and that mentality needs to stop or change.


The additional benefit of a job however, is that those people are less likely to be the ones to 'tap out' the Canadian Pension Plan, something I thought you said concerned you.

And it doesn't have to be either a job OR volunteering.

I have two "retired" relatives. One is unhappy and does nothing but complain and clean the house all day, living off investments and a small Social Security check. Rarely gets out of the house. Refuses to volunteer. Doesn't even golf or play bingo.

The other one is happy, started their own business after retirement, volunteers at the DeVos hospital, has money to travel, for post graduate studies, to go on work teams to poor nations, etc. In other words, works AND volunteers.

BTW, if you ever show the plan to someone at or near retirement, I would think that two benefits of the Amway business for those people are that they could stay mentally and socially active in their retirement years. Plus they could make some money if they do it right.
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#10
Bridgett Wrote:I don't have a job and I'm mentally and socially active. :grin:


Uh - you're a MOM. You most certainly have a job (or twenty) Wink
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